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REBEL KING - BOOK ONE - HAMMER OF THE SCOTS COVERS THE SAME TIME PERIOD AS

THE OUTLAW KING MOVIE

EXCEPT WITH MANY MORE DEVELOPED, INTERESTING CHARACTERS AND MANY

MORE ACTUAL, DETAILED EVENTS STRAIGHT FROM THE HISTORICAL RECORDS .

Book 1

 

Book 2

 

Book 3

 

GET ANY OF OUR E BOOKS FROM AMAZON FOR THE SMALL PRICE OF $2.99 OR FREE ON KINDLE UNLIMITED

 

    Histories Reviews & Readers Authors Articles    

 

 

Dianna

Carolyn with Diana Gabaldon at Grandfather Mountain Highland Games

 

About us…

           We, Charles Randolph Bruce and Carolyn Hale Bruce, were successful award-winning designers, illustrators, copywriters, researchers, and art and creative directors in the field of advertising, before we switched careers and became self published novelists. All this work led to our being invited to participate in a panel discussion entitled, "Successful Self-publishing" at the 2008 Virginia Festival of the Book, later broadcast on C-Span2's Book TV.

 

VA book logobook TV

 

Some of the Scottish shields seen on the Bannok Burn battlefield

Scot battle shields



SOME OF THE CHARACTERS FROM
REBEL KING - HAMMER OF THE SCOTS

Isabel McDuff

The young Countess of Buchan, Isabel McDuff, stole her husband's best war-horses and joined King Robert's struggle to free Scotland. When she was captured she was treated most inhumanely by the English King, Edward I.

Christopher Seton

Sir Christopher Seton was married to King Robert's sister, Christian. He was one of Robert's closest lieutenants and paid dearly for his fight for Scotland's freedom.

King Edward I

King Edward I of England was known as "Longshanks" in the movie, Braveheart. He sent three armies north to kill Robert and from his sick bed personally prosecuted the war against the small Scottish army.

Angus McDonald

Sir Angus Og Macdonald, Lord of the Isles, trades in everything from foods and wares to mercenaries and slaves, and as far away as the Mediterranean. His fleet of galleys makes the core for King Robert's navy.

Earl of Pembroke

Sir Aymer de Valence, Earl of Pembroke, is paid 1,000 pounds by Edward I to take his army north to kill the newly crowned King of Scots, Robert the Bruce. The Scots are quick to discover that the earl is far from the chivalrous noble they had thought him to be.

Christina of Carrick

Lady Christina of Carrick, kinswoman and past lover of Robert's, comes back into his life to help him fight the English invaders. Courageous and clever she becomes a real asset to the war effort.

Dungal Macdouall

Lord Dungal Macdouall was a Scot yet fought violently against King Robert, who captured and released him three times hoping he would join the side of the Scots.

   

 


A REVIEW

by Thomas Allen Bruce
High Commissioner of the Chief of the Name of Bruce

In Hammer of the Scots Charles Randolph Bruce and Carolyn Hale Bruce have done a very admirable job in blending fact, and admittedly some myth, into an extremely entertaining story that leaves the reader eager for the next part of the saga.

Though the book is a retelling of the story of King Robert the Bruce's struggle to gain the throne of his ancestors, the term "Hammer of the Scots" in the title refers to King Edward I of England, who had the Latin phrase "Malleus Scottorum" posted on his tomb in Westminster Abbey. The reader soon finds out the reason for the phrase as the title; Edward I is the main obstacle in Robert Bruce's quest to become King of Scots and to restore an independent Kingdom of Scotland. The book commences at the beginning of 1306; Edward has set himself up as ruler of Scotland, and his ruthlessness and military power will fall like a hammer upon anyone who opposes him.
The Bruce is also known as the "Hero King." His most influential biographer, Archdeacon John Barbour, writing in the 14th Century, described his many heroic exploits, including single-handedly slaying 14 men who had been pursuing his party, and plunging neck deep in a moat to demonstrate to his men that it could be forded. In their novel Charles Randolph Bruce and Carolyn Hale Bruce capture this heroic character well, while at the same time portraying Robert the Bruce as a person who seems real, instead of the cardboard "heroic figure" that lesser writers would have ended up with. The juxtaposition in the novel of the characters of King Edward of England and King Robert of Scotland creates very real tension that gives the reader a sample of the anxiety that must have been felt by Robert the Bruce as he contemplated what would happen to himself and all of his followers if his quest failed.
This book, which is planned as the first of five, ends in July, 1307. There is much more to look forward to in future installments, including the Scot's great victory at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314.
With the Hammer of the Scots my kinsman Charles Randolph Bruce and his co-author Carolyn Hale Bruce have presented a workmanlike fictional impression of the life and times of a great national hero.


 

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